#1  
Old 03-20-2024, 08:15 PM
Jimbobeast Jimbobeast is offline
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Default reverse lockout binding

The reverse lock out on my 70 is binding. I recall the arm on the restored column moving easily when I put the coulmn in. The tranny shifts into reverse like butter. The linkage from the reverse lever to the column is correct and free. It is the arm on the column that is now binding. I loosened the column to gearbox splined attachment as well as the colum to shaft attachment and gave them as much play as I could. No change. I shot WD-40 and some white lithium grease into\ the column where the arm inserts and I worked that sucker back and forth and it's a LITTLE bit better, but nothing like my other 70. I can move the lever with one finger there.
Any ideas on how to fix this?

  #2  
Old 03-20-2024, 11:43 PM
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65 Lamnas 65 Lamnas is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jimbobeast View Post
The reverse lock out on my 70 is binding. I recall the arm on the restored column moving easily when I put the coulmn in. The tranny shifts into reverse like butter. The linkage from the reverse lever to the column is correct and free. It is the arm on the column that is now binding. I loosened the column to gearbox splined attachment as well as the colum to shaft attachment and gave them as much play as I could. No change. I shot WD-40 and some white lithium grease into\ the column where the arm inserts and I worked that sucker back and forth and it's a LITTLE bit better, but nothing like my other 70. I can move the lever with one finger there.
Any ideas on how to fix this?
If it got a little better after lubing it, then it sounds like it just needs more time to soak. I've found an excellent penetrating oil that's WAY better than WD-40 and PB Blaster, yet not as expensive as Kroil. You can get it from Amazon or else many farm stores carry it. If more soaking doesn't work , then it might simply need removed disassembled and cleaned, or maybe you'll find something worn or otherwise needing repair during disassembly.
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  #3  
Old 03-21-2024, 05:19 PM
Jimbobeast Jimbobeast is offline
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thanks

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Old 03-21-2024, 07:24 PM
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unruhjonny unruhjonny is offline
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have you inspected to ensure that nothing was installed backwards?

You might laugh, but it happens by honest mistake, and even subtle changes can drastically change geometry;
Just because it fits there doesn't mean it's installed correct.

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1970 Formula 400
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  #5  
Old 03-24-2024, 04:44 PM
Jimbobeast Jimbobeast is offline
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I ordered some of the Free All penetrating oil but I need to understand where the binding can occur. I bought the coulmn refurbished many years ago (10) from a reputable column restorer. As I recall, I traded him 3 non-tilt column plus several hundred $$. I don't specifically recall the reverse lock out binding or not, but I will assume it was free and then something I did on installation (new lock cylinder, formula wheel, horn and ignition switch) has caused the binding condition. Can anyone tell me what I could have done to create this situation?
Also, Jonny, what could I have installed backwards?
I really don't want to take the dash apart again.

Thanks.
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  #6  
Old 04-02-2024, 06:57 AM
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Holeshot71 Holeshot71 is offline
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Maybe the bell on the column is rubbing on the dash?

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  #7  
Old 04-04-2024, 08:24 PM
Jimbobeast Jimbobeast is offline
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I contacted Jerry Hollenbach, who originally restored this column and his first thought was that the screws for the reverse light switch might be too long and binding, so I removed the switch. No change. He, too feels there may be some contact between the column and dash, so tomorrow I will drop the column and see what happens.

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Old Yesterday, 07:16 PM
Jimbobeast Jimbobeast is offline
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So, good news. Jerry and Holeshot71 were right - the top of the column was rubbing on the bottom of the dash. I loosened the two 9/16" nuts and lowered the column a bit and then inserted 1/8" spacers and tightened the whole thing back up. Voila! No more binding and the reverse lock-out moves with ease. Thanks again to this forum for all the help.

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